Wednesday, July 15Entertainment At It's Best
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King Promise Reveals How Highlife Plays A major Role In His Music

Award-winning Ghanaian singer King Promise has revealed the Ghanaian indigenous music genre of Highlife plays a major role in his music.

Best known for his songs like Oh Yeah, Selfish, Commando, and many others King Promise is widely regarded as an afro beats artist, however, his songs have an element of highlife representing.

In a conversation with Okay Africa’s Chantal Azari, King Promise opens up on the impact Highlife has had on him and his career.

King Promise revealed growing up in Ghana shaped him musically, which has resulted in his sound becoming a blend of highlife, R&B, dancehall and, to some extent, hip-hop!

He also names the likes of Ofori Amponsah, Kojo Antwi, Drake, Sarkodie, Chris Brown, John Mayer, and R2bees as his influences.

“I grew up on highlife music, which plays a major role in the direction of my sound and that’s mainly because of my environment,” explains King Promise. “The way of life and growing up in Ghana has shaped me musically. When you listen to my sound, you hear a blend of highlife, R&B, dancehall, and to some extent, hip-hop! I grew up on so much diverse music that all of these influences have molded me into the artist I am now. Some of my heavy influences are Ofori Amponsah, Kojo Antwi, Drake, Sarkodie, Chris Brown, John Mayer, and R2bees, just to name a few.”

On what inspires him to write, King Promise credits life as he believes people should be able to connect with his music.

 

“Life inspires me to create! I believe whatever I write/create has to mean something to someone,” adds King Promise. “People should be able to connect with the music. I’m always writing about things we all experience, the good, the bad, joy, heartbreak, everything we all go through. Things we can all relate to. Sometimes they are my own stories, sometimes it’s something a friend has experienced or even something I might have seen on tv. Bottom line is that people should be able to feel and relate to the music.”

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